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24/7 Software Blog

The same issue keeps happening.

Day 1: “Where’s the resolution for this incident?”

Day 2: “Where’s the resolution for this incident?”

Day 247: “Where’s the resolution for this incident?”

You’ve had the same issue pop up for the last 247 days – so far.

And, did you even notice before we just brought it up?

If you did, what do you think cause you to miss it?

Could it have been that it’s such a small concern you probably didn’t think to consider its long-term impact on your operation?

If you didn’t catch it – that’s fine.

But, this small problem might be causing (or amplifying) a big problem in your operation.

Day 248.

Oh, we’re not done yet.

Your problem won’t fix itself.

Day 248: “Where’s the…”

You stop mid-sentence.

You just realized – for the first time – you’ve been asking this question to Kim, your operations manager.

You’re not sure how long either (248 days), but you know it has been a while.

And, long enough that Kim’s response is now a habit.

“I’ve got it written on my notes. Here you go,” she replies as she hands you her notebook without looking.

You assert, “we’ve got to stop this.”

So, what is your next step? Do you know how to improve this part of your process?

Keep reading; we’re going to share how using the Kaizen methodology to remove ‘waste’ like this from your operation.

It’ll support your efforts to achieve Proactive Operations and maximize your performance every day.

Ready?

“Tesla Motors started selling its stock to the public in 2010 — the first initial public offering of a U.S. automaker in more than a half-century. On Tuesday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk said he's considering a reversal — taking the electric car company private,” writes Avie Schneider in their recent NPR article entitled “8 Years After Going Public, Elon Musk Wants To Take Tesla Private.”

“As he often does, the outspoken entrepreneur took to Twitter to deliver the news. ‘Am considering taking Tesla private at $420. Funding secured,’ Musk tweeted in early afternoon, according to the article.

Schneider explains, “Tesla stock was trading at about $355 a share before Musk's tweet. It jumped about 5 percent after the tweet. But later in the afternoon, trading in the stock was halted pending an official company announcement.”

“That came shortly before 3:30 p.m. when Tesla published an email that Musk sent to company employees, saying that no final decision on taking the company private had been made and that it would ultimately be left to shareholders,” states the NPR piece.

"The reason for doing this is all about creating the environment for Tesla to operate best. As a public company, we are subject to wild swings in our stock price that can be a major distraction for everyone working at Tesla, all of whom are shareholders," Schneider’s article reveals that Muck wrote.

And there it is.

The reason why Musk wants to take Tesla private.

It’s quite noble if you ask us.

But, there’s also a lesson here.

You’ve got to do right by your team and take charge to cultivate an environment that allows everyone to “operate best.”

Now, ask yourself: “Am I leading the initiative to create the environment for our team to operate best?”

Keep reading; today we’re going to share one proven methodology to help you create the environment you need that’ll benefit you, your staff and boss, and your most treasured assets – your customers.

Ready?

“Pilots with billionaire Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic company climbed to 170,800 feet — about 32.3 miles — and reached 2.47 times the speed of sound Thursday in the third successful rocket-powered flight of the company's newest spacecraft,” writes James Doubek in their recent NPR article entitled “Virgin Galactic Space Plane Reaches New Heights In Test Flight.”

“The company says the test flight was the first time the plane, named VSS Unity, reached a layer of the atmosphere called the mesosphere, which lies about 31 to 53 miles above the Earth's surface,” explained Doubek.

According to Doubek’s article, “Virgin Galactic, which describes itself as the "world's first commercial spaceline" designed the VSS Unity to carry two pilots and six passengers into space to experience a few minutes of weightlessness.”

“The Unity works by first being carried by the larger VMS Eve aircraft. Both planes reached a height 46,500 feet Thursday before the Unity had a ‘clean release’ and the pilots ‘lit the spaceship's rocket motor, before pulling up into a near vertical climb and powering towards the black sky at 2.47 times the speed of sound,’ according to The Spaceship Co., a subsidiary of Virgin Galactic, writes Doubek.

The NPR piece shared, “After reaching its intended height, the company says the Unity glides down and lands without propulsion. It landed safely at a facility in Mojave, Calif., on Thursday.”

Talk about new heights, right?

Virgin Galactic blew the roof off innovation – and landed safely.

You can’t beat that, which is why we thought it was so critical to talk about in today’s article.

We want you to reach new heights.

And, this story boosts our motivation to do so even more.

“The ideal Italian pizza, be it Neapolitan or Roman, has a crisp crust flecked with dark spots — marks left by a blazing hot oven. The dough is fluffy, moist and stretchy, and the toppings are piping hot. A pizzeria's brick oven pops these out to perfection, but intrepid home cooks attempting to re-create Italian-style pizzas have more than likely discovered facsimiles are nigh impossible to produce,” writes Angus Chen in their recent NPR article entitled “Pizza Physics: Why Brick Ovens Bake The Perfect Italian-Style Pie.”

"Even if you prepare [the pizza] the same way, you cannot get the same result with just your oven at home," says Andreas Glatz, a physicist at Northern Illinois University and pizza enthusiast, in Chen’s article.

According to the NPR piece, “The fact that you need a vaulted brick oven to bake a great Italian-style pizza is well-known, but Glatz and Andrey Varlamov, also a pizza-eater and physicist at the Institute of Superconductors, Oxides and Other Innovative Materials and Devices in Rome, wanted to know why. The secret behind a pizzeria's magic, they concluded in a paper published on arXiv.org last month, is in some unique thermal properties of the brick oven.”

“They started off interviewing pizzaiolos, or pizza makers, in Rome who were masters of the Roman style of pizza. For this, the bake lasts 2 minutes at 626 degrees Fahrenheit. (Neapolitan pizzas usually bake at an even higher temperature — at least 700 degrees.) That turns out a ‘well-baked but still moist dough and well-cooked toppings,” Glatz says in Chen’s article.

“The same settings in a conventional steel oven produce far less ideal results,” explains Chen.

"You burn the dough before the surface of the pizza even reaches boiling, so this is not a product you will want to eat," Glatz further explains in the NPR piece.

If you’re a pizza lover, today you’ve learned there is an optimal way to make it.

And that got us thinking about your operation.

We’re firm believers that there’s also an optimal way to run your operation.

That’s why we decided to the take learnings we gathered from Chen’s article to discuss why using a methodology will help create the best results for you.

Keep reading; we’re confident you’ll see the similarities between pizza physics and operations too.

“There has been a car theft in parking lot GG.”

“A thunderstorm is approaching at 15 MPH.”

The calls are coming in.

“We have…”

You turn off your radio for a moment.

You stare at the mirror knowing you only have thirty seconds before your operations coordinator sends out the bat signal because you haven’t responded to your calls.

Cupping your hands under the faucet, you let the water run over them.

You slowly splash your face to make sure this isn’t a nightmare.

“Yep, this is real,” you mutter to yourself.

You put on your glasses, turn on the radio, and rush out of the restroom.

While your team is panicking over the radio, you open the restroom door to the thousands of customers moving throughout your property.

Your goal is to keep smiles on their faces and to ensure they never find out anything is ever wrong.

It’s a big goal, and not always achievable for your team.

More calls are coming, but they aren’t incident calls.

It’s your team.

You can hear the panic in their voices.

A few variations of “We weren’t prepared for this” make their way over the radio.

You head to the operations center.

“There’s no way to prepare for all of these incidents,” you tell yourself.

But, we’re here to tell you there is.

You’ll need to employ Proactive Operations because incidents occurring on your property is an instance of when not if.

“Netflix says its faulty forecasting caused it to miss its target for new subscribers, falling short by more than a million even as it reported quarterly earnings that beat analysts' expectations,” writes Scott Neuman in their recent NPR article entitled “Netflix Falls Short On Subscriber Target, Spooks Investors.”

Neuman explained, “The streaming service that has ventured in recent years into original productions, such as The Crown, House of Cards and Stranger Things, reported a profit of $384.3 million, or 85 cents a share, up from 15 cents a share the previous year. Revenue was up 6 percent to $3.9 billion.”

“However, investors appeared spooked by the missed subscriber forecast, causing shares to fall by 14 percent to $345.63 in extended trading Monday,” the NPR article continues.

Neuman’s states that according to The Associated Press, "The company gained 5.1 million subscribers worldwide during the quarter, more than 1 million below the number that management had believed it could. It marked the first time in a more than a year that Netflix hadn't exceeded its subscriber growth projections. As of June 30, Netflix had 130 million subscribers, including 57.4 million in the U.S."

This article hit home for us even though Netflix is a different business in a different industry than you altogether.

All organizations are working hard to drive growth, and while an innovative company like Netflix is doing everything possible to ensure growth – they too can hit low months.

Do we chalk it up to poor management, processes, say it’s an anomaly, or they’ve just had a bad month?

Next month should be better, right? That got us thinking.

We say it depends on your approach.