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24/7 Software Blog

Whether you’re a general manager, director of operations, director of security and parking, or event manager at a convention center – your day starts early.

On event day, it’s a super long day.

You start with emails, check phone messages, and respond to them all.

That’s only the beginning, and you’re probably ready for the door by 10 AM.

Does this sound familiar?

Now you must walk the 1,000,000 plus square foot space you oversee looking at room sets, reviewing floor plans, and confirming pre-conference and post-conference meetings.

You’re busy.

Extremely busy.

The last thing you want to be burdened with and stressing over is your staff doing their job.

Agree?

You want peace of mind knowing they’re checking rooms, putting things in the right place, and checking the “stuff” that needs to be checked.

From one end of your property to the other, you need location inspection software that’s going to help you safeguard staff accountability and strengthen operational processes throughout your convention center.

Today, we’re going to show how location inspection software is the solution that can help your staff efficiently and effectively inspect everything, and with superior accountability in place.

Let’s go!

“After 18 years, Apple is killing iTunes — well, sort of. The media management software for most Mac users (and many Windows users) is being broken into separate pieces for separate uses: Music, podcasts and television will soon have their own apps on the new Catalina Mac operating system,” writes Andrew Flanagan and Jasmine Garsd in their recent NPR article entitled, “iTunes' Death Is All About How We Listen To Music Today.”

According to the article, “Apple announced the move on Monday along with new hardware, including a new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR, and entertainment and lifestyle features.”

“Apple laid to rest a misapprehension that the iTunes Store (where users purchase songs and albums for download) would be going away in favor of Apple Music (the company's streaming service). The iTunes Store will remain, as will the music that people bought from it. But Apple did address a long-running complaint from users of the iTunes desktop app: mainly, that it's trying to be too many things at once,” Flanagan and Garsd explain.

The NPR piece continues “At Monday's conference, Craig Federighi, Apple's senior vice president of software engineering, joked about this. ‘Customers love iTunes and everything it can do,’ he said, before sarcastically asking: ‘But if there's one thing we hear over and over, it's 'Can iTunes do even more?' "

“Apple announced it will be launching a new stand-alone music app for Mac, as well as a new and improved TV app and a podcast app. And it said device syncing will now be handled in the Finder, the macOS file manager. Apple did not say how syncing iPhones or iPads would be handled on Windows machines,” share the NPR authors.

“iTunes will continue as a music store, but the new music app will be more closely aligned with Apple's music-streaming service,” the article explains.

You might be wondering:

Is there a cost-effective and efficient way for your airport to manage lost and found items and reunite visitors with their lost possessions?

You’re in the right place if you’ve ever asked yourself either question.

We understand the importance and value of lost and found software.

More importantly, we know how it can solve your airports lost and found problems.  

Now:

You’re reading this article which means you’re probably in the market for a software solution or at least recognize the need for a change on how your airport manages lost and found items.

Good news: you’re still in the right place.

We’re going to highlight the functionality, benefits, and value of a superior software solution – one that you’d want to implement throughout your airport property.

“Drones have become an increasingly popular tool for industry and government,” writes Brian Naylor in their recent NPR article entitled “We're Not Being Paranoid': U.S. Warns Of Spy Dangers Of Chinese-Made Drones.”

“Electric utilities use them to inspect transmission lines. Oil companies fly them over pipelines. The Interior Department even deployed them to track lava flows at Hawaii's Kilauea volcano,” Naylor explains.

“But the Department of Homeland Security is warning that drones manufactured by Chinese companies could pose security risks, including that the data they gather could be stolen,” the article continues.

According to Naylor’s piece, “The department sent out an alert on the subject on May 20, and a video on its website notes that drones, in general, pose multiple threats, including ‘their potential use for terrorism, mass casualty incidents, interference with air traffic, as well as corporate espionage and invasions of privacy."

"We're not being paranoid,” the video's narrator adds.

“Most drones bought in the U.S. are manufactured in China, with most of those drones made by one company, DJI Technology. Lanier Watkins, a cyber-research scientist at Johns Hopkins University's Information Security Institute, said his team discovered vulnerabilities in DJI's drones,” Naylor shares.

"We could pull information down and upload information on a flying drone. You could also hijack the drone," Watkins explains in the NPR piece.

Watkins notes in Naylor’s article, “The vulnerabilities meant that ‘someone who was interested in, you know, where a certain pipeline network was or maybe the vulnerabilities in a power utilities' wiring might be able to access that information."

According to Naylor, “DJI offered a bounty for researchers to uncover bugs in its drones, although Watkins said Johns Hopkins didn't accept any money.”

You’ve got to manage a plethora of data.

From your issues to incidents, to your work orders and customer service requests – your team is communicating a lot of information.

It can be overwhelming, especially if you’re using multiple tools to manage each aspect.

But, that’s not all.

You’re probably using your incident management system (IMS) to manage everything coming into your command center.

Issues, incidents, customer requests, and important operational task are all managed from your IMS.

Does this sound familiar?

We cannot stress enough how dangerous this is to the efficiency of your operation.

It’s a matter of time before low-priority items go under the radar and nothing gets done.

You must change this today.

But how do you start?

You stop critical operational tasks from integrating with your high-priority incidents.

You separate them.

You implement task management software.

“Imagine spending 40 years and more than a billion dollars on a gamble,” writes Nell Greenfieldboyce in their recent NPR article entitled, “Billion-Dollar Gamble: How A 'Singular Hero' Helped Start A New Field In Physics.”

According to Greenfieldboyce, “That's what one U.S. government science agency did. It's now paying off big time, with new discoveries about black holes and exotic neutron stars coming almost every week.”

“And while three physicists shared the Nobel Prize for the work that made this possible, one of them says the real hero is a former National Science Foundation staffer named Rich Isaacson, who saw a chance to cultivate some stunning research and grabbed it.”

"The thing that Rich Isaacson did was such a miracle. I think he's the hero. He's a singular hero. We just don't have a good way of recognizing people like that. Rich was in a singular place fighting a singular war that nobody else could have fought," says Rainer Weiss, a physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and one of the 2017 Nobel laureates, in the NPR piece.

Weiss continues in the article, “Without him, we would've been killed dead on virtually every topic."

And it’s a good thing Isaacson saw the chance and grabbed it.

It’s a great lesson for proactive leaders too.

See an opportunity for your property operation?

Go for it.

But you’ve got an advantage Isaacson did not.

Your success should take less time and less money.

Especially you’ll have a proven methodology already in place.

You do not need a billion-dollar gamble.

Agree?