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24/7 Software Blog

“Netflix says its faulty forecasting caused it to miss its target for new subscribers, falling short by more than a million even as it reported quarterly earnings that beat analysts' expectations,” writes Scott Neuman in their recent NPR article entitled “Netflix Falls Short On Subscriber Target, Spooks Investors.”

Neuman explained, “The streaming service that has ventured in recent years into original productions, such as The Crown, House of Cards and Stranger Things, reported a profit of $384.3 million, or 85 cents a share, up from 15 cents a share the previous year. Revenue was up 6 percent to $3.9 billion.”

“However, investors appeared spooked by the missed subscriber forecast, causing shares to fall by 14 percent to $345.63 in extended trading Monday,” the NPR article continues.

Neuman’s states that according to The Associated Press, "The company gained 5.1 million subscribers worldwide during the quarter, more than 1 million below the number that management had believed it could. It marked the first time in a more than a year that Netflix hadn't exceeded its subscriber growth projections. As of June 30, Netflix had 130 million subscribers, including 57.4 million in the U.S."

This article hit home for us even though Netflix is a different business in a different industry than you altogether.

All organizations are working hard to drive growth, and while an innovative company like Netflix is doing everything possible to ensure growth – they too can hit low months.

Do we chalk it up to poor management, processes, say it’s an anomaly, or they’ve just had a bad month?

Next month should be better, right? That got us thinking.

We say it depends on your approach.

“Taxi,” you hear the guy to your left scream.

He’s waving his arm with hopes of getting the attention of a cab.

But, no luck.

Large groups of people rush the taxi line as the day ends.

Many of the customers are in groups of two or more.

They flood the available taxis leaving anyone riding solo struggling to catch a cab.

“Taxi,” you hear him again as he flares his arms.

Now he’s flustered.

As you’re about to walk over to help, someone from taxi services approaches him.

“Sir, would you like a cab,” he asks. “Yeah, I’ve been trying to wave one down, but they are all taken before I can get their attention,” the frustrated man responds.

“Would you like another drink before you leave,” asks the staff member.

Confused by the question, the man replies, “Sure, I could use one, why?”

“Give me your phone number, enjoy a beer at our restaurant, and I’ll hail a taxi for you,” Jerry, the staff member, suggests.

Jerry takes the man’s number and directs him to the restaurant still open to customers.

How’s this for customer service?

Are you wondering how Jerry can perform first-class customer service?

He uses the go-to solution proactive operations rely on to make customers happy before, during, and when your property closes for the day.

If his customers need something, he and his team get it done.

We have good news; you too can efficiently manage the needs and requests of your customers.

Keep reading because this article explains how to perform best in class customer service.

“Starbucks announced on Monday it plans to eliminate plastic straws from its 28,000 stores worldwide by 2020,” writes Jennifer Liberto in their recent NPR article entitled “Starbucks: Goodbye, Plastic Straws.”

According to Liberto, “The company will broaden the manufacture and use of what some in social media have dubbed the ‘adult sippy cup.’ It's a plastic strawless lid that will come to replace single-use plastic straws that now inundate its coffee shops.”

“The company says the move, when fully implemented, could mean a billion fewer plastic straws across its stores each year. And it's a part of Starbucks' $10 million investment in creating recyclable and compostable cups around the world,” Liberto explains.

"For our partners and customers, this is a significant milestone to achieve our global aspiration of sustainable coffee, served to our customers in more sustainable ways," Kevin Johnson, president and chief executive officer for Starbucks, said in a statement, according to the NPR piece.

While reading Liberto’s article, we quickly recognized how Starbucks’ drive as a sustainable organization offered a lesson for change to be applied to your organization.

Yes, the “adult sippy cup” can educate your team.

And in fact, it’s a two-part lesson we’ve identified.

Did you happen to catch it?

Don’t worry if you didn’t. It doesn’t entirely jump off the page. For a moment, we had to contemplate the nuances ourselves.

But, it is valuable, and we’re going to discuss both parts below.

So, are you ready?

You walk into the Administration office.

“Where are we at,” you ask your team.

Last night’s event was massive.

The size of the event was more than your staff is used to managing.

The number of issues and incidents captured was overwhelming by your operational standards.

Today your team is inundated because of all the files to review.

“Incident #1023 is missing,” one of your operation coordinators shouts as you walk by their cubicle.

You pick up your pace, walk into your office and shut the door.

It’s only 9 AM, and you’re already anxious about today’s call with your General Manager.

After telling yourself that everyone will have to spend today sorting through the files, you run out the door to gather your team and share the game plan.

“Hey team, stop what you’re doing for a moment and let’s get a strategy together for getting through this day,” you yell across the office.

Immediate silence takes over because they’ve been waiting for you to propose a solution.

Everyone in the office turns with a troubled look on their faces.

You find out why quickly.

The phones are ringing off the hook.

“What’s going on?” you ask your operations manager, Brian.

“Customers from last night, especially VIPs are calling to discuss the brawl that ‘ruined their night’ on the suite floor,” he responds.

“Customers want to review and discuss the incidents from last night, but everything is so disorganized we just can’t provide the information they request.”

Now, you’re panicking.

You need a solution, or you’ll lose your customers.

How would you handle this at your property?

Can you effectively communicate information about incidents with your customers when they call to discuss?

Keep reading; we have a simple yet powerful fix for your documentation needs.

You’ll learn about the robust documentation capabilities of a world-leading incident management system, and how to review and discuss incidents with customers efficiently.

Are you ready?

“Yes, certainly. We can take care of that for you,” you respond to Shari over the phone.

Shari has requested a proposal to host an event on your property.

You have a lot going on during event days like today, but always have time to seed another possible sale.

“Of course,” you continue.

While you and Shari continue your conversation, Jason from your Executive team walks up to the counter with a cell phone.

He puts the cell phone behind the counter.

“Chris found this phone near men’s restroom 103-A,” he whispers to avoid interrupting you.

You nod from habit.

Eight minutes later, you finish your sales call with Shari.

As you reach for the stapler, you see the lost cellphone Jason left behind.

You grab the phone. “Shoot, what was this for,” you exclaim.

Because your department oversees the only lost and found location and you cannot recall who dropped this phone off on your counter, it’s your responsibility now.

Since you were focused on your conversation with Shari, you didn’t even see who brought the item over to you.

It is only one item but imagine the effect on your operation as more lost & found items make their way through your lost and found department.

It gets worse when the item doesn’t have details of where it was found or who found it.

How do you manage this?

How do you ensure all employees and departments are held accountable to get items back to customers?

Who could even be accountable in this scenario – besides you?

You have enough responsibility.

You don’t want poorly managed lost and found as a reason to tick off your customers.

Today, you need to employ lost and found software.

“Facility managers define their operation,” you tell the group.

You can’t recall where you initially heard that but know you like it.

Maybe you read it in a blog.

Today, you’re presenting to a group of facility managers.

You’re a 20-year veteran in the industry, so you know the importance of these future leaders.

They create the foundation, the processes.

They develop their team’s talent and bring goals to fruition.

But, what does it take to achieve the level of being an effective facility manager?

You ask the group.

“Poise,” one gentleman says.

“Modern technology,” a lady in the back of the room shouts.

“Now, you’re on to something,” you reply.

You might be thinking that it’s a surface-level concept.

From the way you train your team to how often you achieve a perfect compliance rating.

Yes, that’s worth applause.

But, while all of that is commendable, it is not enough.

You need details.

It requires proven actions – habits.

“What are the specific measures facility managers need to take,” you continue asking.

“How do you ensure you become a highly-effective manager?”

Even if the group is not sure, keep reading, because we’re going to show you.