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24/7 Software Blog

Your operation’s performance is the result of your leadership.

You define your operation.

But the job is not always easy.

That’s why we believed writing this article is necessary.

It’s critical to the longevity of your career and property.

We get it; you work your tail off to ensure your facility is up to compliance standards.

That requires a lot of work and management.

You might even be laughing at this article.

But, when is the last time you took a step back to grasp your reality?

It has probably been a while, right?

We all get caught up in the minutiae of our day-to-day tasks.

It makes it easy to miss the global strategy.

In fact, a proactive facility manager would tell you that it’s vital to your operation’s health to take a step back and look at your strengths and weaknesses.

Why?

You might catch something to fix that you’ve been spinning your wheels on for a while.

Well, today we’re telling you to hit the pause button and take a moment of your year to focus on being proactive.

What do you say?

We owe you an apology.

We made a sizable mistake.

In our article on choosing a guard tour system for your facility, we stated that “your security team is tasked with conducting guard tours covering 100,000+ square feet, multiple entryways, and more restricted areas than Area 51.”

In fact, we were wrong.

Well, sort of.

We missed a zero!

Yes, it’s true, 100,000+ does cover quite a bit of space.

However, 1,000,000+ square feet of property susceptible to incident overload is more like it!

We’re talking a whole lot of responsibility.

We feel for you, which is why we believe this article on finding the right incident management software for your physical security operation will change your life.

Don’t stop here.

Keep reading, because we promise to show you how you can improve your incident reporting with the right type of incident management system (IMS).

“My search for the secrets of American ketchup began in a sun-baked field near Los Banos, Calif,” writes Dan Charles in their recent NPR article entitled “Meet The Man Who Guards America's Ketchup.

“The field didn't look like much at first. Just a wide, pale-green carpet of vines. Then Ross Siragusa, the head of global agriculture for the company Kraft Heinz, bent over, lifted up some of the vines, and revealed a mass of small, red fruit, too many to count,” shares Charles.

According to Charles, “Each acre of this field, Siragusa tells me, will produce about 60 tons of tomatoes. That's up from about 40 tons per acre just 15 years ago. The tomatoes themselves are a mix of tomato varieties that are specially bred to produce red, thick ketchup.”

“A mechanical harvester approaches at the pace of a brisk walk. It's a giant machine, a factory on wheels. It collects a swath of tomato plants, shakes fruit loose from the vines, and sends a stream of bright red tomatoes into a big truck driving alongside. The scale and speed of the operation boggles the mind,” the NPR piece continues.

Charles explains, “Within a day, a processing plant in Los Banos will turn these tomatoes into paste. Weeks or even months later, the paste will become the central ingredient in ketchup.”

“Nothing in this scene, from the tomato varieties to the mechanical harvester, existed when the Heinz company created the classic version of American ketchup many decades ago,” Charles continues.

“And I wonder, has ketchup's taste changed, too?” asks Charles.

According to the article, “Siragusa says that he doesn't know. But he knows somebody who would. A man named Hector Osorno. They call him the ketchup master, which is actually a formal title at Kraft Heinz.

"He's completely obsessed [with ketchup]. He's got secrets that he won't divulge," Siragusa tells Charles in the article.

“A few hours later, I meet Osorno. He's smiling the way people do when they're hiding delightful secrets,” shares Charles.

"What makes you a ketchup master? Is it your skill? Your knowledge?" Charles asks Osorno.

Osorno tells Charles in the article, “I like to think that it is my skill. But it's probably my stubbornness more than anything else. I'm obsessive to do the right thing the first time."

Most emergency planning prepares you for severe threats to your property.

You run through real-life scenarios for active shooters and bomb threats regularly.

But, there’s one vital piece of your emergency planning that’s much harder to anticipate and avoid.

Do you know what that is? Adverse weather.

Mother Nature’s level of impact is unpredictable and something you’ll never be able to prevent.

But you can ready yourself. You can prepare your property and team for what’s inevitably coming your way – sooner or later.

You need to create procedures for adverse weather, just like any other emergency. Do you have anything currently in place?

Once you get your procedures developed and then fortified for efficiency, you must leverage a solution to ensure emergency communication is flawless.

To ensure you have adequate procedures for adverse weather preparation and management, we created an infographic.

It outlines critical protocols to follow during a severe weather situation, and how a solution can maximize your team’s effectiveness when lives are at stake.

“AT&T, Sprint and Verizon and nine other telecommunications companies teamed up with attorneys general of all 50 states plus the District of Columbia to announce a new pact to eradicate a common scourge in America: illegal robocalls,” writes Brakkton Booker in their recent NPR article entitled “Phone Companies Ink Deal With All 50 States And D.C. To Combat Robocalls.”

According to Booker’s article, “The agreement, which amounts to a set of anti-robocall principles, is aimed at combating and preventing the phone-ringing annoyance. Included in the deal is call-blocking technology that will be integrated into a dozen phone networks' existing infrastructure, at no additional charge to customers.”

“The tech giants will also provide other call blocking and call labeling for those customers who want more screening tools,” shares Booker.

"We owe it to the most vulnerable in our communities to do everything in our power to protect them. Thanks to these prevention principles, our phones will ring less often," North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein said at an announcement in Washington on Thursday, according to the NPR piece.

The article continues, “Stein and other attorneys general who spoke at the press conference said that while robocalls regularly present hassles and interruptions for millions of Americans, in some instances, the calls can also be harmful.”

"Robocalls are also a very effective device for illegal conduct," said New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon MacDonald, according to Booker’s article.

We believe it.

Well, that’s also because we experience it.

How many robocalls do you get a day?

The fact that you receive any is unacceptable.

Agree?

They’re a common scourge.

But the US government is introducing a set of anti-robocall principles to combat this annoyance.

It’s like the reactive operations annoyance you might have plaguing your operation.

Most operations are reactive.

But you don’t have to be.

You can employ Proactive Operations.

And specifically, by using a proven Principle to help your jump-start this initiative.

We call it the ACDA Principle™ (pronounced act-duh), and it’s your starting point for combating a reactive operation.

You’re driving home from your most recent event.

Thinking.

Pondering.

Analyzing.

How did it go?

There were a few unexpected incidents, and you were not ready for them.

Those poor part-timers looked petrified by the rush of people during the lightning storm.

You should’ve gone over what exactly to do during a severe weather incident.

Tonight’s event was a little too chaotic for your taste.

What to do, what to do?

What do you do?

When was the last time you had similar thoughts running through your mind after an event?

It must be troubling to experience this on a regular basis knowing there’s more to come.

You use analytics to better respond to incidents.

But, how do you train your employees to better respond to all these incidents you’re aware of?

Read between the lines, and you’ll find the solution: role-playing.