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24/7 Software Blog

“Consider, for a moment, the circuitous journey of the insecticide called thiamethoxam, on its way to killing a wild wasp,” writes Dan Charles in their recent NPR article entitled “New Evidence Shows Popular Pesticides Could Cause Unintended Harm To Insects.”

“Alejandro Tena, a researcher at the Valencia Institute of Agricultural Research, in Spain, mixed the chemical into water used to irrigate clementine trees. This is a common practice among citrus farmers. As intended, the tree roots absorbed the insecticide, and it spread throughout the trees' branches and leaves,” Charles explains.

The article continues, “A mealybug landed on the clementine tree, bit through the bark, and began feeding on tree sap underneath. The bug ingested traces of the insecticide. This, in fact, is how thiamethoxam is supposed to work.”

“Unfortunately, though, the pesticide's journey wasn't over. Traces of it showed up in a sticky, sugary, substance called honeydew that the mealybugs excrete. Honeydew is an important food for other insects, such as wasps and hoverflies. In Tena's experiments, wasps and hoverflies that fed on this contaminated honeydew died in large numbers. Wasps and hoverflies are a fruit grower's friends, because they help to fight harmful insects,” Charles writes.

According to the NPR piece, “Tena's study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is just the latest evidence that a family of pesticides called neonicotinoids, sometimes just called ‘neonics,’ can pose risks to the insect world that are not fully understood.”

We read this NPR article and thought, “wow.”

Talk about severe implications from an approach you believe to be working.

But the evidence is clearly proving the opposite.

It’s a contrast we can relate to with property operations.

Your property’s reactive mindset could be causing unintended harm.

But to what?

Everything from your awareness, to your communication to your documentation, and your ability to analyze valuable information is affected.

Not to mention, the long-term effect of this is on your staff and customers.

That’s dangerous.

Let’s change what you can control using the Proactive Operations methodology.

The end of summer is coming up in September.

We figured it would be an excellent time to reflect on how you did so far.

How do you think your season is coming along?

Did you oversee several events?

We’re aware of the summer of festivals, and we know your customers are paying big bucks to have fun.

But, with that brings the potential for threats to your operation.

From issues to incidents, you must be prepared for all things.

How would you measure your efficiency?

If you’re not sure how to measure your ability, here’s a question for you: as an event manager, how stressed are you?

If your stress level is high, there’s a very high probability that your efficiency could be lower than you need.

We get it; knowing this is overwhelming.

But we’re going to help you get through it and understand the areas of your operation you should address to reduce this stress.

We’ve created a principle that helps you understand your current strategy – it’s called the ACDA Principle™ (pronounced act-duh).

It covers the four areas of your operation: Awareness, Communication, Documentation, and Analysis.

We encourage you to refer to the Principle regularly.

It’ll keep your efficiency high, and your stress low.

“Electric cars are all over the roads these days. But what about electric planes?” writes Ari Shapiro in their recent NPR article entitled “With An Eye Toward Lower Emissions, Clean Air Travel Gets Off The Ground.”

According to the article, “Air travel currently accounts for only about 2% of global carbon emissions. But it's expected to grow in the next century, and clean air travel is seen as a key part of slowing global warming.”

"We're expecting to see massive growth. The International Civil Aviation Organization projects upward of 700 percent growth by the middle of the century. So while it is small, it is going to be a larger and larger share," says Umair Irfan in Shapiro’s article, who writes about climate change, energy and the environment for Vox."

Irfan’s data got our attention.

We had an interesting observation – and takeaway – from this article and the information shared about the growth.

Can you see it?

Of course, there’s not a direct correlation, but the growth and the proactive introduction of a solution are aligned with our approach to operations.

Now, do you see it?

Okay, no more hints.

It’s how Proactive Operations got started, and it’s important to know because you’ll quickly understand the need for this methodology off the ground on your property.

Keep reading; we share how it all started below.

That way, you can have context and see how the supercritical framework for operations started.

In 2014, we wrote the original version of this article because of an epiphany.

At the time, it baffled us how often we discussed all the actions that lead to increased or decreased response times, such as awareness and communication, without focusing on response times in general.

And most importantly, why they are so extremely important for your property’s operation.

Thankfully, we experienced clear skies and warm weather down here in Florida that helped us think clearly.

That led us to write this short and sweet gem on response times.

The original version of this article might be an artifact by now.

But the information and insight you pull from everything we have below are as important today as it was in 2014.

“Equifax will pay up to $700 million in fines and monetary relief to consumers over a 2017 data breach at the credit reporting bureau that affected nearly 150 million people,” write Avie Schneider and Chris Arnold in their recent NPR article entitled “Equifax To Pay Up To $700 Million In Data Breach Settlement.”

According to the article, “The proposed settlement, which is subject to approval by a federal court, was announced Monday by the company, the Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 48 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.”

“The consumer data exposed in the breach included Social Security numbers, birthdates and addresses and, in some cases, driver's license numbers,” Schneider and Arnold explain.

The NPR piece continues “CFPB Director Kathleen Kraninger said the settlement includes $425 million to cover the ‘time and money [people affected by the breach] spent to protect themselves from potential threats of identity theft or addressing incidents of identity theft as a result of the breach."

“Equifax also agreed to pay $175 million to the states and $100 million to the CFPB in civil penalties,” the article notes.

According to Schneider and Arnold, “starting in January, Equifax ‘will provide all U.S. consumers with six free credit reports each year for seven years,’ the FTC said. That's in addition to the free annual credit reports that Equifax, and the two other nationwide credit reporting agencies — Experian and TransUnion — currently provide.”

Do you oversee operations at a convention center?

If you’re charged with any role at one, you know that processes, people, and information are vital to your efficiency.

Your role doesn’t matter either.

You’re still tasked with making sure your property is running smoothly and looking good.

Location inspection software can quickly enhance your operation to help you achieve both.

We’re going to show you how this software solution augments your property’s efficiency.

  • Improve execution and accountability of staff and the control of information between all of your departments.

As a leader of your convention center, the safety, experience, and lasting impression you create for your customers, always rests on your shoulders.

Do you agree?

These solutions help.

And we’re going to show you how.

It’s time to increase efficiency at your property using location inspection software.

Are you ready for Proactive Operations?