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24/7 Software Blog

If you oversee a property, you have customers.

You probably already know this - customers lose their possessions.

It’s bound to happen, right?

It’s inevitable.

Billy loses his cell phone.

Katie misplaces her purse.

Alex loses his wallet.

All of them are going to be very frustrated simply because losing stuff is frustrating.

Lost and found software can help you ease the stress associated with losing one’s possessions.

That is if you’re using the right type of system.

Today we’re going to show you how to move away from using spreadsheets to “manage” your lost and found operation.

We’re also going to show you four ways a superior software solution can be leveraged to maximize your operation’s efficiency.

We’ll conclude with the #1 characteristic your lost and found software is more than likely missing right now – and how to solve that problem.

It’s an obvious one, but one deficit most operations have when it comes to their lost and found efforts.

Are you ready to enhance your customer experience and build enormous amounts of loyalty?

Excellent, let’s get started.

“New evidence indicates that Boeing pilots knew about ‘egregious’ problems with the 737 Max airplane three years ago, but federal regulators were not told about them,” writes David Schaper in their recent NPR article entitled “Boeing Pilots Detected 737 Max Flight Control Glitch 2 Years Before Deadly Crash.”

“Investigators say the plane's new flight control system, called MCAS, is at least partially to blame for 737 Max crashes in Indonesia in 2018 and Ethiopia this year that killed 346 people. Acting on data from a single, faulty angle-of-attack sensor, MCAS repeatedly forced both planes into nosedives as the pilots struggled, but failed to regain control,” Schaper explains.

According to the article, “The pilots in the Lion Air plane that crashed in Indonesia last October did not know MCAS existed, as Boeing did not disclose any information about it in pilot manuals or in training material.”

“Newly revealed instant messages sent between Boeing's then-chief technical pilot for the 737, Mark Forkner, and another technical pilot, Patrik Gustavsson, in November 2016 indicate that Forkner experienced similar problems with MCAS during a test session in a flight simulator,” the NPR piece continues.

Schaper writes, “In a transcript obtained by NPR, Forkner writes that ‘there are still some real fundamental issues’ with the system that he says Boeing engineers and test pilots ‘claim that they are aware of."

And we’ve all witnessed the aftermath.

Unfortunately, the harsh reality of these incidents is they could happen to any organization responsible for keeping people safe.

That includes your operation.

Let that set in for a moment.

Keep reading; we’re going to show you how Proactive Operations lets you detect glitches in your operation before the effect is a negative one.

Are you charged with running events?

If so, you’re in the right place.

Today, we’re going to examine the various aspects of running an event.

Most important, we’re going to address it with the intention of achieving the goal – customer safety and experience.

That way, you can achieve your personal goal: Proactive Operations.

Wouldn’t you like the peace of mind in knowing every one of your events is running smoothly?

After many years in the industry, we believe we’ve figured out the secret for ensuring an effective and efficient event operation.

Whether you’re running a large-scale event at a convention center, music festival, fair, or stadium, we’re confident you’ll benefit from the five solutions we want to share with you today.

An ultimate package for ultimate events.

Individually, these are superior solutions.

All with unique and valuable features that can benefit all types of industry operations.

Imagine their power when you combine their abilities into one ultimate event management package for your operation.

We’re going to show you how to execute legendary event management using the most innovative solutions in the marketplace.

Are you ready?

Let’s go.

“A thief walked into a San Francisco gallery on Sunday afternoon, plucked a rare Salvador Dalí from an easel in the front window, and strode out the door,” writes Laurel Wamsley in their recent NPR article entitled “Salvador Dalí Etching Stolen From San Francisco Gallery In 'Snatch And Run.”

“Rasjad Hopkins, associate director at Dennis Rae Fine Art Gallery, was working at the time. The door to the gallery was open, and Hopkins had his back turned,” shares Wamsley.

"Snatch and run," Hopkins tells NPR.

According to the NPR piece, “It took just a few minutes to realize the etching was gone. For some reason, the work hadn't been locked with a tether as it normally was.”

“Hopkins never did see the thief, though surveillance footage from the hotel next door appears to show a young man in a flat-brim cap holding the work casually in one hand as he walks down Geary Street in the Union Square neighborhood,” writes Wamsley.

"Never saw him before in my life," Hopkins said in the article.

“The hand-colored etching is called Burning Giraffe (1966), and it's from a series in which the famous surrealist riffed on works by Pablo Picasso. In the Picasso series, the Spanish painter depicts all the stages of a bullfight,” Wamsley explains.

Wamsley emphasizes, “Hopkins says that of Dalí's etchings, Burning Giraffe was the most important. It's numbered, one of a series of 100 made on the same kind of paper.”

Let’s look at the perspective of how important this piece is.

How does this resonate with you?

Is there a specific part of your operation that’s vulnerable – one you want to protect?

What’s your Burning Giraffe?

It could be one aspect of your operation or the entire operation you’re focused on protecting.

Either way, you’ve got to lock it with a tether to ensure no one pulls a ‘snatch and run’ on your property.

Agree?

Keep reading; we’re going to put you in the best position to prevent this on your property.

You need to employ Proactive Operations.

Providing first-rate customer service is paramount.

We know it’s one of the top goals on your list.

We also know it is the top goal on your boss’s list.

The fan experience is essential to everyone’s livelihood.

You certainly can’t guarantee a win, perfect weather, or prevent car trouble on the way.

But you can and must deliver the highest level of service.

Face it.

You’re in the business of creating memories as much as your star players.

Preparing for and delivering to your customers a safe, clean, and friendly environment is fundamental to the fan experience and that’s the stuff that leaves customers wanting to return to your property for more events.

With your well-trained and dedicated team members, you can ‘make things happen’ at every point of contact with your customers.

For every location, every person on your team can affect a fan’s experience, positively or negatively.

Every impression, every interaction, they all count.

“Virtual reality — long touted as the next big thing in tech — hasn't taken off as a consumer product, but employers are embracing it as a more efficient and effective tool for on-the-job training,” writes Yuki Noguchi in their recent NPR article entitled “Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees.”

According to Noguchi, “This year, Walmart is training more than 1 million employees using virtual reality. And moving companies, airlines, food processing and financial firms are all using VR in different ways. In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery.”

“The sensory immersion is key to its effectiveness. Because things look and sound as if they were real, the brain processes virtual reality as though it were a real experience, says Stanford communication professor Jeremy Bailenson, who also founded the school's Virtual Human Interaction Lab,” the article explains.

"People learn by doing ... getting feedback on mistakes, and then repeating and iterating," Bailenson says in the NPR piece.

Noguchi shares, “Not every workplace situation is conducive to virtual reality training. Some tactile skills, for example, are better experienced in real life. But the technology is especially useful for training people for novel or emergency situations.”

This statement resonated with us.

We’re not pushing VR as your next medium for training.

Although it might work, we’re still advocates of life environment training and tabletop exercises that help you get the closest you can to the real experience – safely.

It also gives you the hands-on practice with your operations management software.

Keep reading; we’re sharing the benefits in this article, especially when it comes to improving performance.