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24/7 Software Blog

“A commuter train outside Philadelphia smashed into a parked train car, hurting 42 passengers early Tuesday, but an official said none of the injuries were life-threatening,” according to Scott Neuman’s recent NPR article entitled “More Than 40 People Injured In Train Crash Near Philadelphia.”

Neuman explains, “The collision happened just after midnight at the 69th Street Terminal Center in Upper Darby, Pa., about 10 miles west of Philadelphia, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority spokeswoman Heather Redfern told Reuters.”

“The Norristown High Speed Line train was pulling into the station when it hit a second, unoccupied train car. The operator was among those injured, she said,” Neuman writes.

"The injuries appeared to be non-life threatening for all passengers and the operator," Redfern said. ‘It's all under investigation at this point,” the article continues.

According to the article, “The Associated Press quotes Upper Darby Mayor Nicholas Micozzie as saying that four of those hurt were in critical condition.”

“In February, four people were injured at the same terminal when a train smashed into the back of another train. And, in 2015, an Amtrak train derailed near Philadelphia, killing eight people and injuring 180,” Neuman explains further in the article.

We’re grateful to know this incident did not result in any deaths.

But, it did get us thinking about how your transportation authority is handling events like this.

And, how you should be handling these incidents.

“Residents of some Maine islands say lack of decent internet is keeping them from participating in the economy. Jobs are in short supply and telecommuting isn't practical,” according to Fred Bever’s recent Weekend Edition Sunday podcast on NPR entitled “For Maine Islands, Internet Means Opportunity.”

Weekend Edition Sunday’s host, Lulu Garcia-Navarro, explains in the opening comments of the report that “If you've ever dreamed of moving to an idyllic vacation spot, Maine's coastal islands offer a cautionary tale. Jobs are limited to lobstering, boat building and caretaking of summer residences. And lousy Internet service makes telecommuting difficult to impossible. But now some Maine lobstermen and would-be telecommuters are banding together to pay for costly infrastructure they hope will help preserve a threatened way of life.”

While Maine’s coastal islands are not your property, this story offers an excellent lesson.

The lack of Wi-Fi infrastructure present amongst properties is improving – we’ve certainly noticed. However, not all properties have invested in this upgrade.

In fact, Bever’s report is a cautionary tale on the current limitations associated with having limited or poor Wi-Fi infrastructure.

It’s also a familiar setback many organizations continue to face.

Communication between staff, whether they can perform their role on the fly, and your ability to interact and support guests is greatly influenced by your property’s Wi-Fi infrastructure.

How does your property match up? Is it up to par?

 

“I’m tired of this,” you growl.

“We’ve got so many different types of incidents to deal with and even more inefficiencies,” you grumble.

Your second-in-command, Nick, has approached you in the past about making drastic operational improvements, so he lets you rant in hopes that today you have an epiphany.

You start listing everything wrong with your operation. Nick smiles.

  • “Confusing procedures prevent efficiency and effectiveness.”
  • “Incident calls get overlooked due to lack of resources and time to respond.”
  • “Incomplete documentation leads to legal battles and finger-pointing.”
  • “Radio traffic clogs communication lines and prevents the exchange of critical information.”
  • “No one is aware of the things that I know are occurring.”

You finally stop, because you realize this list can go on and on.

Nick looks at you, picks up his dry erase marker, and takes control.

“We’ve got incident after incident, and some are different – some are the same. But, there is a common thread that I believe valuable solutions can help with immediately,” he states.

Nick continues that “our overall performance is directly related to our team’s ability to,” and he writes these four factors on the dry erase board:

  • Quickly respond to incidents
  • Complete accurate and digital reports
  • Check off pertinent inspection items
  • Report potential hazards

You interrupt him before he can justify, “I couldn’t agree more. Now, what do we do?”

“Multiple destructive storm systems damaged property and killed at least 19 people over the weekend, and continued to batter much of the U.S. with rain, snow and wind today,” writes Rebecca Hersher in her latest NPR article, “Destructive Storms Soak, Batter And Bury Communities Around The Country.”

Hersher confirms that “All 19 reported deaths were in the South, where apparent tornadoes ripped through towns over the weekend, damaging and destroying buildings in multiple states.”

"Trailers are just flat, just laid on top of people," Debbie Van Brackel, a volunteer EMT in Adel, Ga., told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Sunday. "You need a bulldozer to pull it off. Trailers are upside down."

According to Hersher’s NPR article, “The newspaper reported that 15 people died in the southern part of the state, including seven people in a mobile home community in Adel and four people in the town of Albany, Ga.” Click here to read more.

Each and every one of us at ISS 24/7 would like to extend our prayers and condolences to the families affected by these destructive storms, and the relatives of the victims taken by these disasters.

Patrick Marsh of the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., told The Associated Press that “39 possible tornadoes were reported in the Southeast over the weekend. Of those, most were reported in Georgia,” Hersher continues.

The destruction did not stop there. Please read Hersher’s article to see how these destructive storms significantly impacted various parts of the United States this week.

These tragedies highlight the importance of preparing your property for unexpected adverse weather that could “batter and bury” your operation.

The outcome can change quickly, and you must be ready for what’s coming.

Lives are at stake.

According to a recent CNN Wire article, “An interminable TSA airport line descended into a horror as a man unleashed streams of wasp spray onto scrambling travelers and swung a machete at people before bolting through a security line.”

The article continues, “Newly released video — obtained by the New Orleans Advocate — shows the first moments of the March 2015 attack at the city’s airport which ended with the shooting of the machete-wielding man. The attacker later died from three bullet wounds inflicted by a sheriff’s lieutenant.”

CNN’s article contains a video that shows how the incident unfolded.

The article states that “in the video, the man — identified as Richard White, 63 — is seen at the top of the frame as he calmly walks up to a line of travelers at a TSA checkpoint at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.”

How would your airport respond to this? How would you want this handled?

Could your airport mitigate this situation effectively?

90,000 fans are screaming for their home team.

It is the final minutes of the 4th quarter for Thursday Night Football. Your home team is down by seven points with 2:42 left on the clock.

You are watching the clock, but not because your biggest concern is whether the team scores to tie the game.

You know that you are two minutes and forty-two seconds away from a smooth egress going off without a hitch.

You finish up your protein bar and start to pack your briefcase. The weather is beautiful, so you call your wife to Google a restaurant for a much deserved Thursday night dinner by the water.

The refs call the two-minute warning on the field.

Your team has everything under control. You start making your way down the hall. It looks like you will be able to hit the road a few minutes early tonight.

However, you start hearing loud chatter throughout the hallway. Then, your radio goes off. Your team is trying to contact you.