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24/7 Software Blog

We’re one month away from the official end of summer.

We figured it would be an excellent time to reflect on how you did so far. How do you think your season is coming along?

Did you oversee a number of events? We’re aware of the summer of festivals, and we know your guests are paying big bucks to have fun.

But, with that brings the potential for threats to your operation. From issues to incidents, you must be prepared for all things.

How would you measure your efficiency? If you’re not sure how to measure your ability, here’s a question for you:

  • As an event manager, how stressed are you?

If your stress level is high, there’s a very high probability that your efficiency could be low.

We get it; knowing this is overwhelming.

But, we’re going to help you get through it and understand the areas of your operation you should address to reduce this stress.

We’ve created a principle that helps you understand your current strategy – it’s called the ACDA Principle™ (pronounced act-duh).

It covers the four areas of an operation:

“An update from the Wild Wild West of fake news technologies: A team of computer scientists have figured out how to make words come out of the mouth of former President Barack Obama — on video — by using artificial intelligence,” writes Aarti Shahani in their recent NPR article entitled “Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential For Faking Video.”

Shahani writes that “if you've been on the Internet at any point in the last year, there's a good chance you've come across fake news articles. Soon we may see a wellspring of fake news videos.”

“As a team out of the University of Washington explains in a new paper titled ‘Synthesizing Obama: Learning Lip Sync from Audio,’ they've made several fake videos of Obama,” according to the NPR piece.

“Take, for example, a time that he discussed the Pulse nightclub shooter and said "the investigation is ongoing, but we know that the killer was an angry and disturbed individual who took in extremist information and propaganda over the Internet,” Shahani explains.

The NPR article continues that “Obama did, in fact, say these words. But the computer scientists were able to make it look like he said them in places different from where he actually did — in this instance, in a different room at the White House. Audio and video images could be manipulated to make it look like he said them at a different time — say as a much younger Obama.”

This video shows the variants the team created during their project:

“If Senate Republicans get their way, former Justice Department lawyer Christopher Wray will soon become the next director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation,” explains Carrie Johnson in their recent NPR article entitled “5 Questions For FBI Director Nominee Christopher Wray.”

According to Johnson, “Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, recently told reporters he hopes the nomination will ‘not languish’ and said it's his plan to get Wray confirmed before the August congressional recess.”

“But before any votes take place, Wray will have to face a series of questions about his background — and his backbone,” Johnson shares in the NPR piece.

According to Johnson, the following are the five questions Wray is expected to answer:

“Received call from a guest. Their elderly father claimed to have slipped on a wet spill near the men’s restroom at Section 112.”

You hear this over the radio as you walk into the command center.

“How are we doing,” you ask your operations manager, Kristine.

She nods and continues her radio call.

“John, have you arrived on the scene,” she radios to one of your mobile supervisors, John. A few minutes later he responds.

“Yes, I’m here, but no one else is.”

You look at Kristine and shake your head in frustration. She’s frustrated too.

What’s happening here?

Are your teams ignoring calls? Are they missing the calls because there is too much noise over the radio? How are things getting overlooked?

What’s causing this inefficiency?

The confusion continues as your command center team tries to get personnel to the location.

Five minutes goes by. Seven minutes.

Now, it has been 15 minutes.

“We’re all leaving now. We took care of everything,” John calls in.

“What do you mean we’re all leaving,” Kristine responds.

“Oh sorry, everyone arrived on the scene after we last spoke,” he replies.

According to a recent NPR article entitled 'It Was A Mistake Of Epic Proportions,' United CEO Testifies and written by Camila Domonoske & David Schaper, the CEO of United Airlines was “in the hot seat on Capitol Hill” Tuesday morning.

The NPR article states that CEO Oscar Munoz was “answering pointed questions from members of Congress about last month's incident in which a United passenger was dragged off a plane.”

"’It was a mistake of epic proportions,’ United CEO Oscar Munoz told representatives, as he explained how United has changed its rules moving forward. ‘In hindsight, clearly our policies broke down," explains Munoz in the article.

We agree with both statements. But, did this “mistake of epic proportions” or the ‘policy breakdown’ need to happen?

No - which is why many other airlines were questioned.

Domonoske and Schaper’s article explains that “executives from other airlines” were present as well during the examination.

Their report says that Congress scrutinized “customer service problems across the commercial aviation industry and considers legislation to better protect airline passengers.”

Why does it always take a devastating incident to drive change? Why don’t you regularly review your processes to avoid potential breakdowns altogether?

The calls are coming in.

“Fight in section 201.” “There has been a car theft in parking lot GG.” “A thunderstorm is approaching at 15 MPH.” “We have…”

You turn off your radio for a moment. You stare at the mirror knowing you only have thirty seconds before your operations coordinator sends out the bat signal because you haven’t responded to your radio calls.

Cupping your hands under the faucet, you let the water run over them. You slowly splash your face to make sure this isn’t a nightmare.

“Yep, this is real,” you utter to yourself. You put on your glasses, turn on the radio, and rush out of the restroom.

While your team is panicking over the radio, you open the restroom door to the thousands of guests moving throughout your property.

Your goal is to keep smiles on their faces and to ensure they never find out anything is ever wrong. It’s a big goal, and not always achievable for your team.

More calls are coming, but they aren’t incident calls. It’s your team. You can hear the panic in their voices. A few variations of “We weren’t prepared for this” make their way over the radio.