blg.png

24/7 Software Blog

Last night’s event had you scrambling.

Your team responded to one incident call after another.

No one had any downtime.

About 100,000 people attended this year’s motocross show. Dirt, ramps, and professionals flying in the air on dirt bikes.

Who wouldn’t want to participate, right?

For your customers, it was a night they will never forget.

You’re just glad it’s over.

Now, it’s 5 AM Monday morning.

You always get to your office early these days to prepare for the Monday morning calls.

You start scouring through your office.

You’re looking for the stack of incident files from last night’s event.

The executives always want a snapshot of the previous week’s events.

It’s not too bad, but it’s been a real struggle to get all the information, so you’ve been dropping the ball lately.

You cannot afford to lose it again.

They need the number of incidents, customer requests, injuries, medical evacuations, fights, and ejections.

They’re known to throw some tough questions at you from time to time.

You’re running on empty because of last night, and this might be the final straw for you if you don’t find the files you need.

You already “misplaced” incident reports in the past.

You’re out of excuses.

“Where are last night’s documents,” you scream down the hall.

Everyone looks at you, and your operations coordinator, Tyler, responds, “Everything is in your office.”

But, you only see the remnants of a couple of files from customer services’ reports.

It appears that Housekeeping saw the files stacked near your trash pile.

Everything is gone.

You panic because you know you’re going to be taken out like the trash too.

It is 9 AM.

Time for your call.

You have nothing, and your job is on the line.

How does this make you feel? Could this have been prevented?

Yes.

“Among the lawmakers' concerns: How Facebook might make up possible abuses to its users — and whether Zuckerberg himself is telling the truth when he promises to obey Europe's privacy laws,” writes Bill Chappell in their recent NPR article entitled “Are You Telling The Truth?' European Parliament Questions Mark Zuckerberg.”

According to Chappell, “Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg took questions from members of the European Union Parliament on Tuesday about allegations that personal data of European Facebook users was misused. The testy session ended with several members of Parliament complaining that Zuckerberg had failed to address their most pressing questions.”

“Zuckerberg conceded that Facebook had not been ready to fight off fake news that spread quickly on its site. And he apologized for the improper use of millions of users' data to help political campaigns, after an analytics company gained information that had been collected by a quiz app,” the article explains.

"Whether it's fake news, foreign interference in elections or developers misusing people's information, we didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibilities," Zuckerberg said in Chappell’s NPR piece. "That was a mistake, and I'm sorry," he continues in the article.

Whether you believe Zuckerberg is telling the truth or not, we’ve pinpointed an essential lesson for you.

Keep reading; we’ll explain.

We’ve talked about the impact of ‘truth’ throughout your operation for years now.

But, sometimes the concept and its importance are overlooked.

It’s not because you want to overlook it either.

You’re just charged with managing a ton of responsibilities, so truth in your data can become a missed issue.

We get it; you’re confronted with high-priority situations at a fast pace.

But, that’s also why this lesson is essential – it’ll help you get the truth.

It’s time to pause, refocus, and get the right information starting today.

Put your pen down.

Stop writing.

You know what you’re doing is bad for your operation. But, you’ve been doing it so long it’s hard to stop.

You’re using pen & paper.

Not just to write notes and doodle either.

You’re using pen and paper to record everything vital to your operation – especially incident reports.

The recording device that you’re using to capture important incident details is pen and paper.

How could you!?

Please, put your pen down, step away from the incident report on your desk, and read this article in its entirety.

Because we know you’ll tell us you’ll stop writing.

But, we don’t believe you.

Why? Because while many operations have moved on, you’re still holding on… to that pen.

It’s why we need you to know why it’s terrible for your business.

That pen is crippling your departmental teams, affecting liability protection, and destroying your operational performance.

This practice of handwriting information is miles from Proactive Operations.

But, here’s the good news. You can change it.

Yes, it takes effort to move away from using pen & paper.

Trust us, though. Once you make the switch – your performance will skyrocket, and your stress level will drop.