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24/7 Software Blog

“It's been used by brands such as American Airlines, Panasonic and Toyota. It's all over the signage in the New York City subway system. Even Google, Apple and Netflix used it for a time,” write Scott Simon and Samantha Raphelson in their recent NPR article entitled “Helvetica, The Iconic Font Both Loved And Loathed, Gets Its 1st Redesign In 36 Years.”

According to the article, “Helvetica is ubiquitous around the world, but despite its popularity, the typeface has some issues: letters scrunch together at small sizes and the space between them can be uneven.”

“Now, after 36 years, the widely used — and widely controversial — font is getting a makeover,” share Simon and Raphelson.

The NPR piece continues that, “The upgrade was designed by the Massachusetts type giant Monotype, which controls licensing for Helvetica. The company has updated each of Helvetica's 40,000 characters for the digital age, offering three new sizes designed to work on everything from billboards to the tiny screens of a smartwatch. The updated font even has a new name: ‘Helvetica Now."

“Like many changes, though, some people are skeptical,” the article explains.

Skepticism is common when questioning the status quo, change, and your current state.

Agree?

We love to challenge it, though.

It’s in our nature.

But we know it’s difficult to manage change – especially when it’s not always a top priority for your property.

So how do you do it?

How do you redesign your operation to “operation now”- the next generation of your property’s operation?

Keep reading; we’re going to show you.

“A wire fox terrier named King has taken the crown at the 143rd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. He's the 15th wire fox terrier to win "Best in Show,” writes Matthew S. Schwartz in their recent NPR article entitled “It's Good To Be King: Wire Fox Terrier Wins Westminster Dog Show.”

"You know, I love you all,’ said Best in Show judge Peter Green as he stood in front of the finalists. ‘Every one of you.’ Then Green, who spent years honing his own craft as a professional dog handler to terriers, raised his arm and pointed at the dog he apparently loved the most. ‘He's best in show," shares Schwartz.

According to the NPR article, “The 7-year-old King is ‘as good as it gets,’ Green said, according to USA Today. ‘The head, the expression. Everything is really, really as good as it gets. And then the handler has him in perfect condition," explains Schwartz.

"I look at King, he's like a beautiful painting, a piece of art,’ King's handler, Gabriel Rangel, said earlier in the day. ‘The way he stands and performs, he's the whole package," the piece continues.

Kudos to King and his handler, Gabriel, for a remarkable victory.

It certainly got us thinking about one thing.

Is your operation “as good as it gets” or can it be improved?

Can you get better?

We believe you can, and that’s because your operational environment is always changing.

It’s always evolving.

That requires you to rethink what being as good as it gets is – every day.

Now, that’s not a bad thing or something you cannot handle.

But, you need to have the right mindset, fierce discipline, and a proven methodology engrained into your operation, all the way from your team’s behavior to your processes to the technology you use.

Keep reading; we’ll explain.

“Last fall, Corey Chase drove 6,000 miles around his state to ground-truth what every Vermonter with a cell phone knows: there are many, many places in the state where you simply can't get a signal, not to mention the 5 megabits per second data download speeds the carriers were claiming,” writes John Dillon in their recent NPR article entitled “One Man's Quest To Prove Vermont Has Terrible Cell Service.”

According to the article, “The six-week effort involved six cell phones, a state-owned Prius and an app from a software developer in Bulgaria.”

“What Chase, a Vermont Department of Public Service employee, found is now part of a detailed challenge before the Federal Communications Commission that officials hope will bring federal dollars into the state to improve the wireless network,” explains Dillon.

The NPR piece continues that “Chase, a telecommunications infrastructure specialist, drove the equivalent of Montpelier to Los Angeles and back. But his windshield time was along state roads and through town and village centers, at a slow pace of 40 mph. And occasionally he found himself on no road at all.”

"There's apparently a road that goes from Stamford to Bennington. I tried to take said road, and there's a state-government printed sign on the road that says: 'Your GPS is wrong, turn around now,” said Chase, according to Dillon’s article.

“Although Chase saw lots of beautiful sights and foliage driving around the state, his excursion was really a massive data collection project,” Dillon clarifies.

Data collection?

Looking at the weakness in the infrastructure?

While the title of Dillon’s article alone intrigued us, this undertaking hit home.

We see lessons for property operations worldwide.

So many lessons: complacency, change management, identifying your weaknesses, and most important, recognizing that your operation is terrible reactive.

We need to change that.

But, as you’ve seen with Chase’s mission, that requires a lot of time spent collecting data and going places you’re not necessarily comfortable going.

Are you ready to do what’s needed to be proactive?

How do you think your 2018 went?

Do you feel good about the year?

We bet you’re ready to take on 2019 – that’s how proactive leaders are.

But, you might be struggling to achieve a certain level of performance.

Something doesn’t feel right.

Since you’re reading this article, it might have something to do with how many tools you’re using to manage your operation.

Are we close?

You know, you’re using a texting system from one provider and a CMMS from another.

Everything “works,” but not without many communication breakdowns.

No one is on the same page across personnel.

Your operational functions are limited in their success – everyone is getting by.

But, we believe you can achieve maximum performance.

We know you want to employ Proactive Operations correctly.

That’s why you’ve got to read this article.

It’s time to bring your operation together and reinforce your pursuit of perfection.

The same issue keeps happening.

Day 1: “Where’s the resolution for this incident?”

Day 2: “Where’s the resolution for this incident?”

Day 247: “Where’s the resolution for this incident?”

You’ve had the same issue pop up for the last 247 days – so far.

And, did you even notice before we just brought it up?

If you did, what do you think cause you to miss it?

Could it have been that it’s such a small concern you probably didn’t think to consider its long-term impact on your operation?

If you didn’t catch it – that’s fine.

But, this small problem might be causing (or amplifying) a big problem in your operation.

Day 248.

Oh, we’re not done yet.

Your problem won’t fix itself.

Day 248: “Where’s the…”

You stop mid-sentence.

You just realized – for the first time – you’ve been asking this question to Kim, your operations manager.

You’re not sure how long either (248 days), but you know it has been a while.

And, long enough that Kim’s response is now a habit.

“I’ve got it written on my notes. Here you go,” she replies as she hands you her notebook without looking.

You assert, “we’ve got to stop this.”

So, what is your next step? Do you know how to improve this part of your process?

Keep reading; we’re going to share how using the Kaizen methodology to remove ‘waste’ like this from your operation.

It’ll support your efforts to achieve Proactive Operations and maximize your performance every day.

Ready?