blg.png

24/7 Software Blog

“Alberto is pushing deeper inland after making landfall in the Florida Panhandle on Memorial Day, causing flash flooding, mudslides, downed trees and power outages through parts of the South, East and central U.S. and prompting officials to warn of an imminent dam failure in North Carolina,” writes John Stempin and Scott Neuman in their recent NPR article entitled “Remnants Of Alberto Cause Dangerous Flooding In Parts Of Central And Eastern U.S.

“Flooding and mudslides shut down highways in the mountains of North Carolina, west of Charlotte,” Stempin and Neuman explain.

According to the article, “Shortly after midnight, the National Weather Service and local authorities in McDowell County, North Carolina, issued evacuation warnings for people living downstream of Lake Tahoma, where they said a dam failure is ‘imminent."

“It included people living in Old Fort, a largely rural area about an hour from Asheville. It was not clear how many people were affected by the evacuation order,” the NPR piece continues.

"We've had a lot of rain, but we got lucky. It was a constant rain but not a heavy rain," Regina Myers, emergency management director in Walker County northwest of Birmingham, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying, shares Stempin and Neuman later in the NPR article.

While the dangerous flooding was not representative of a Hurricane, it prompted our concern and warranted an article.

Hurricane season starts June 1st in the United States, and Summer officially begins the end of June, which means heavy wind and rain is likely.

It also means you must be proactive.

You must be weather-ready.

We’re here to help!

Are you ready?

“Officials in Atlanta say the city's computer systems are not yet fully operational after a ransomware attack hit the city last week and locked some city data behind a wall of encryption,” explains Doreen McCallister in their recent NPR article entitled “Atlanta Working 'Around The Clock' To Fight Off Ransomware Attack.”

“Tasnim Shamma of member station WABE in Atlanta tells our Newscast unit that cybersecurity experts are working around the clock to restore access to the city's data,” writes McCallister.

"Many city employees have been without access to Internet and email since Thursday after hackers locked some of its systems and demanded a $51,000 payment. The city says it completed part of its investigation of the cyberattack, but it's working on restoring full service," shares Shamma in the NPR piece.

According to McCallister, Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms expressed the importance of cybersecurity and that it is now a top priority for the city of Atlanta.

"There's a lot of work that needs to be done with our digital infrastructure in the city of Atlanta, and we know that year after year, that it's something that we have to focus on and certainly this has sped things up," Bottoms states in the article.

McCallister continues in their article that “Bottoms says the city has continued to operate despite the cyberattack.”

Do you believe Atlanta officials were prepared for an attack like this?

It doesn’t appear that way based on Bottoms’ reference to Atlanta’s infrastructure.

To us, this reads ‘reactive operations’ without question.

Agree?

Mayor Bottoms states that “cybersecurity is now a top priority for the city.”

Aside from Atlanta’s ability to handle this incident, it does present an essential lesson for all operations.

First, let’s address the lesson as a question for you to consider.

Are you working ‘around the clock’ to fight threats from impacting your property, operation, staff, and customers?

Whether your answer is “yes” or “no,” it’s critical that you continue reading.

The calls are coming in.

“Fight in section 201.” “There has been a car theft in parking lot GG.” “A thunderstorm is approaching at 15 MPH.” “We have…”

You turn off your radio for a moment. You stare at the mirror knowing you only have thirty seconds before your operations coordinator sends out the bat signal because you haven’t responded to your radio calls.

Cupping your hands under the faucet, you let the water run over them. You slowly splash your face to make sure this isn’t a nightmare.

“Yep, this is real,” you utter to yourself. You put on your glasses, turn on the radio, and rush out of the restroom.

While your team is panicking over the radio, you open the restroom door to the thousands of guests moving throughout your property.

Your goal is to keep smiles on their faces and to ensure they never find out anything is ever wrong. It’s a big goal, and not always achievable for your team.

More calls are coming, but they aren’t incident calls. It’s your team. You can hear the panic in their voices. A few variations of “We weren’t prepared for this” make their way over the radio.