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24/7 Software Blog

“A big waste of money or the engine of marketplace innovation? That's how some people see basic scientific research. Now a new study shows how basic research and inventions are connected,” according to Joe Palca’s recent All Things Considered podcast on NPR entitled “New Study Highlights Strong Link Between Basic Research And Inventions.”

All Things Considered host, Robert Siegel, explains in the opening comments of the report that “Scientific research can seem abstract or esoteric. But with time, it may turn out to have practical value. A recent study has uncovered a strong link between basic research and inventions that can be brought to the market.”

Palca first asks in the article, “What does the rideshare company Uber have to do with the research of a 19th-century German mathematician named Georg Friedrich Bernhard Riemann?”

He continues that “Benjamin Jones can tell you. Jones is an economist at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.”

According to Palca, Jones “and a colleague decided to make a more systematic study of how connected basic research was to future patented inventions. They looked at 4.8 million patents issued by the U.S. Patent Office and 32 million scientific papers. They focused on papers that had been cited by at least one other scientist.”

What do you think their findings told them? Would you say that even some basic research could lead to innovation?

Your security team is tasked with conducting guard tours.

We’re talking about a property that covers 100,000+ square feet, multiple entryways, and as many restricted areas as Area 51.

You’re not securing extraterrestrials.

But, there’s no doubt your team is keeping busy. We also know it never ends.

Answer this truthfully:

Does your guard tour system give you the accuracy and efficiency needed to do your job most effectively?

If you’re not sure, that’s OK.

Keep reading, because we’re going to give you the insight you need to choose the right guard tour system for your facility.

“Science relies on the careful collection and analysis of facts. Science also benefits from human judgment, but that intuition isn't necessarily reliable. A study finds that scientists did a poor job forecasting whether a successful experiment would work on a second try,” writes Richard Harris in their recent NPR article entitled “Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed.”

According to Harris’s article, “That matters, because scientists can waste a lot of time if they read the results from another lab and eagerly chase after bum leads.”

"There are lots of different candidates for drugs you might develop or different for research programs you might want to invest in. What you want is a way to discriminate between those investments that are going to pay off down the road, and those that are just going to fizzle," says Jonathan Kimmelman, an associate professor of biomedical ethics at McGill University in Montreal, in the NPR piece.

“Kimmelman has been studying scientific forecasting for that reason. He realized he had a unique opening when other researchers announced a multi-million dollar project to replicate dozens of high-profile cancer experiments. It's called the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology. Organizers have written down the exact protocols they would be using and promised not to deviate,” Harris continues.

Harris notes in their NPR article, "This was really an extraordinary opportunity,’ according to Kimmelman because so often scientists change their experiment as they go along, so it's hard to know whether a poor forecast was simply because the experiment had changed along the way.”

Now, while you’re not forecasting results of cancer studies, we found a lesson to be learned here.

Do you see it?

You’re tasked with being the steward of safety at your property.

Ponder that responsibility.

Now, take a deep breath – because it’s a big responsibility.

The security of your guests, co-workers, boss, and every single person who enters your property lies on your shoulders.

You’re always collecting and analyzing tons of information.

From do this, to do that, you’re always faced with supplemental training, new policies or changes in industry best practices, and then tasked to train and monitor your team.

Are they doing everything they need or could be doing?

How do you keep up with all that? How do you know what best practices should be in place for your property?

Don’t you sometimes feel like the tail of a wagging dog?

Let’s change that today.

This is the year you've committed to change.

You’re going to fight hard against the forces of the status quo. You’ve embraced becoming a data-driven leader.

We like to hear that.

Empowering your staff with the ability to communicate effectively will give you the information to fully understand your operation.

It’s the only way to manage because now you’ll know what you’re managing!

You get it. You want it.

You need it!

Any other day we’d tell you why it’s so important to institute best practices and then give you the how.

But today, we’re going to show you how to put your incident management infrastructure in place first.

Then, we’ll show you all the reasons why your new foundation will give you Proactive Operations, on so many levels.

Are you ready? Let’s get started.

2017 is fast approaching.

You need to find out how ‘fast’ your team performed this year.

That way, you can figure out what improvements or changes are needed for the upcoming year.

So, what does your operation look like?

Are you responding to incidents efficiently? Do you have the right amount of resources available? How are your staffing levels? Is it time to invest in a unified solution?

You need to answer these questions, but how?

We’ll save you the guess work.

You need to use analytics, which means you need the ability to capture data that results in purposeful analytics.

Do you have Proactive Operations in place? Are you in a position to rely on your data? Can you trust it?

You need to close out 2016 and get ready for 2017. Today is a great day to start.

But, the only way to do it successfully is by looking at your numbers.