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24/7 Software Blog

You need data to ‘know.’

‘Knowing’ is one of the most important aspects for improving your operation.

However, this often gets overlooked.

  • You are too busy to look at your data.
  • Incomplete and inaccurate documentation.
  • Communication between and amongst departments is below par.

You are missing facts.

Does this sound familiar?

The limitations above prevent your operation from being proactive.

Sadly, you cannot manage what you do not know.

We say it all the time!

It threatens the welfare of an operation like yours.

It is also a multi-part challenge to overcome.

Resolve it by collecting insightful data and using it to improve your operation.

It is time to get the facts.

Today, we are going to show you how.

CMMS can help identify and fix equipment defects.

You can do it – even before the manufacturer finds out.

Don’t believe us?

Ask your colleagues.

Industry experts like yourself tell us how they leverage CMMS software inclusive of preventive maintenance to do just that.

You can efficiently manage and track equipment.

You can keep a good schedule and focus on your facility.

That results in identifying a defect before the equipment’s manufacturer.

It also leads to fixing the flaw much sooner and before it cripples your facility’s operation.

We’re talking about a real reduction in downtime and substantial money savings.

Automation of your maintenance activities becomes easy with your CMMS up and running too.

Scheduled events allow you to focus on running a smooth operation while keeping your equipment up to date.

Preventive maintenance (PM) measures let you quickly identify faulty equipment, reduce downtime, and cut costs.

Keep reading; we’re going to dive into all of this in the following sections.

You are the steward of safety at property.

Take a step back and ponder this responsibility, and then take a deep breath – because it’s big.

The safety of your customers, colleagues, boss, and every person who enters your property rests on your shoulders.

You’re constantly taking in overwhelming amounts of information.

From “do this,” to “do that,” you’re always faced with supplemental training in response to new policies or changes in industry policy.

Then, you’re tasked to train and monitor your team.

Are they doing everything they need or could be doing?

Do you sometimes feel like you have zero control over your operation?

How do you keep up?

How do you know what the best practices should be for your property?

“Thirty-five years ago in Moscow, working on what he says was "an ugly Russian" computer that was frankensteined together with spare parts, Alexey Pajitnov started a side project that has become the second-best-selling video game of all time: Tetris,” writes Vanessa Romo in their recent NPR article entitled “Happy Birthday, Tetris. 35 Years Later You're As Addictive And Tetromino-y As Ever.”

“At the time, Pajitnov was a young developer and programmer whose other interests included a popular puzzle game consisting of twelve shapes that were made up of five square pieces. The object was to create pictures and images using the pentominoes, he explained. His fascination with it was obvious but inspiration for Pajitnov's own game came when he'd finished playing one day and returned the pieces to their box,” Romo explains.

"When you try to put [them] back in the box you're in trouble because it's really hard to do that.’ And thus, the idea for Tetris was born,” the article continues.

According to Romo’s piece, “It is simple and yet has proved to be indomitably addictive. Seven brightly colored four-block pieces, tetrominoes, fall from the top of screen. Slowly at first and then faster and faster, as the player rotates the pieces so they create complete lines. When they do, the line vanishes. When they don't, the blocks begin to stack on top of one another until they fill the screen and the game is over.”

“As soon as Pajitnov had finished the prototype, he knew he had a commercial hit on his hands,” shares Romo.

"I couldn't stop playing it,’ he said, confessing that at work he'd pretend to be busy but really he was in a Tetris trance. ‘Magic is in it,’ he said proudly,” according to Romo.

Now, we want to know:

How addicting is your property? Do your customers want to keep coming back?

Do you want your property to be as addictive as Tetris 35 years later?

Keep reading; we’re going to show you what you need.

Whether you’re a general manager, director of operations, director of security and parking, or event manager at a convention center – your day starts early.

On event day, it’s a super long day.

You start with emails, check phone messages, and respond to them all.

That’s only the beginning, and you’re probably ready for the door by 10 AM.

Does this sound familiar?

Now you must walk the 1,000,000 plus square foot space you oversee looking at room sets, reviewing floor plans, and confirming pre-conference and post-conference meetings.

You’re busy.

Extremely busy.

The last thing you want to be burdened with and stressing over is your staff doing their job.

Agree?

You want peace of mind knowing they’re checking rooms, putting things in the right place, and checking the “stuff” that needs to be checked.

From one end of your property to the other, you need location inspection software that’s going to help you safeguard staff accountability and strengthen operational processes throughout your convention center.

Today, we’re going to show how location inspection software is the solution that can help your staff efficiently and effectively inspect everything, and with superior accountability in place.

Let’s go!

“After 18 years, Apple is killing iTunes — well, sort of. The media management software for most Mac users (and many Windows users) is being broken into separate pieces for separate uses: Music, podcasts and television will soon have their own apps on the new Catalina Mac operating system,” writes Andrew Flanagan and Jasmine Garsd in their recent NPR article entitled, “iTunes' Death Is All About How We Listen To Music Today.”

According to the article, “Apple announced the move on Monday along with new hardware, including a new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR, and entertainment and lifestyle features.”

“Apple laid to rest a misapprehension that the iTunes Store (where users purchase songs and albums for download) would be going away in favor of Apple Music (the company's streaming service). The iTunes Store will remain, as will the music that people bought from it. But Apple did address a long-running complaint from users of the iTunes desktop app: mainly, that it's trying to be too many things at once,” Flanagan and Garsd explain.

The NPR piece continues “At Monday's conference, Craig Federighi, Apple's senior vice president of software engineering, joked about this. ‘Customers love iTunes and everything it can do,’ he said, before sarcastically asking: ‘But if there's one thing we hear over and over, it's 'Can iTunes do even more?' "

“Apple announced it will be launching a new stand-alone music app for Mac, as well as a new and improved TV app and a podcast app. And it said device syncing will now be handled in the Finder, the macOS file manager. Apple did not say how syncing iPhones or iPads would be handled on Windows machines,” share the NPR authors.

“iTunes will continue as a music store, but the new music app will be more closely aligned with Apple's music-streaming service,” the article explains.